Taste, see and tell

Posted by GCI Update on October 9, 2018 under From the President | 3 Comments to Read

This week’s “From the President” is by GCI Vice President, Greg Williams.

Dear Brothers and Sisters:

Greg and Susan Williams

I’m sure we all pray that our non-Christian loved ones—family, friends, neighbors and coworkers—will give God a chance. Each of them has a viewpoint concerning God, but is the God they envision the triune God revealed in Jesus? How can we help them come to know that God in a deeply personal way? How can we help them respond to King David’s invitation in Psalm 34:8 to “Taste and see that the Lord is good”? This is no marketing gimmick—David is referencing the profound truth that God makes himself known to anyone who searches for him. He is inviting us to a robust, life-changing encounter with God—one that engages every dimension of our human existence!

Taste that the Lord is good

Taste? Yes! Experiencing the complete goodness of God is like having delicious food or drink roll over your tongue. Think of rich dark chocolate melting slowly, or perfectly aged red wine puddling on your tongue. Or think of tasting a center cut of tender meat, seasoned with the perfect blend of salt and spice. A similar thing happens when we come to know the God revealed in Jesus. We want the delightful taste of his goodness to linger and last!

Meditating on the richness of the triune God’s nature and the complexities of his ways arouses hunger for the things of God. Jesus said, “Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, for they will be filled” (Matt. 5:6). When we come to know God personally, we long for righteousness—for good and right relationships—just like God does. Especially when things are bad, that desire is so intense that it hurts as if we were starving or dying of thirst. We see that intensity in Jesus’ ministry to those around him and in his anguish over those who reject God. We see it in his desire to reconcile relationships—especially our relationship with his heavenly Father. Jesus, God’s Son, came to give us that good and fulfilling right relationship with God—to share in God’s work of making all relationships right. Jesus himself is the bread of life who fills our deep hunger and hope for good and right relationships. Taste that the Lord is good!

See that the Lord is good

See? Yes! It is through our sense of sight that we behold beauty and perceive shape, distance, movement and color. Think of how frustrating it is when something we long for is blocked from sight. Think of an avid bird-watcher hearing the sound of a long-sought-for rare species, who is unable to see it. Or the frustration of trying to navigate through an unfamiliar darkened room at night. Then consider this: How can we experience the goodness of a God who is invisible and transcendent? That question reminds me of what Moses, perhaps a bit frustrated, said to God: “Show me your glory,” to which God replied: “I will cause all my goodness to pass in front of you” (Ex. 33:18-19).

The Hebrew word translated glory is kabod. Originally meaning weight, it came to be used to refer to the shining forth (for all to see and enjoy) of the totality of who God is—all his goodness, holiness and uncompromising faithfulness. As we behold the glory of God, all hiddenness is removed and we see that our triune God truly is good, and that his ways are always right. In the glory of his righteousness and justice, God is committed to making all things right. Our God of peace and life-giving love is opposed to all evil and has guaranteed that evil has no future. In his glory, the triune God shines forth, revealing his essence and presence—the fullness of his merciful and righteous grace. The light of God’s glory shines in our darkness and reveals the radiance of his beauty. See that the Lord is good.

An unfolding journey

Transfiguration by Bloch (public domain)

Coming to know the triune God is not like hurriedly consuming a fast-food meal or casually viewing a three-minute video clip. Coming to know the God revealed in Jesus Christ involves having the blinders stripped from our eyes, and the taste restored to our mouths. It involves being miraculously healed to see and taste God for who he truly is. Our unaided senses are far too weak and damaged to apprehend the fullness and glory of our transcendent, holy God. This healing is a life-long gift and task—a miraculous, unfolding journey of discovery. It’s like a lengthy meal that involves the explosion of tastes over multiple courses, with each surpassing the previous one. It’s like a compelling mini-series with myriad segments—you can binge-watch it without ever growing tired or bored.

Though an unfolding journey, coming to know the triune God in all his glory has a focal point—what we see and behold in the person of Jesus. As Immanuel (God with us), he is the Lord God become visible and touchable flesh. Jesus became one of us and took up residence with us. By paying attention to him as he is presented in Scripture, we discover the one who is “full of grace and truth” and we behold the “glory” of “the only Son from the Father” (John 1:14, ESV). Although “no one has ever seen God… the one and only Son, who is himself God and is in the closest relationship with the Father, has made him known” (John 1:18). To see God as he truly is, we need look no further than the Son!

Go and tell

Psalm 34 paints a picture of the God who is good, just, loving and personal—the God who wants his children to experience his presence and goodness, and who delivers them from evil. It tells of a God who is so real that our lives are forever transformed and our hearts, like Moses, yearn for him and his ways. This is the triune God to whom we introduce our loved ones. As followers of Jesus, we are called to share in our Lord’s ministry of evangelism—sharing the gospel (good news) that the Lord truly is a good God. For GCI resources to assist you in your ministries of evangelism, click here and here.

Tasting, seeing and telling that the Lord is good,
Greg Williams


PS: In the United States and some other countries, October is Pastor Appreciation Month. I want to extend my personal thanks to the fine men and women who give so generously of their time, talent and treasure in pastoring our congregations around the world. I also want to encourage all our congregations to show their appreciation to their pastor and to their pastor’s spouse.


PPS: The next issue of GCI Update will be published on October 24.